Ktgtoplogo_1First it was Kryptonite's U-shaped bike locks (you can pick them with a bic pen). Now it's Kensington's laptop locking gizmo (you just need scissors, duct tape and a toilet paper). The buzz is all over the blogosphere (thanks to Six Apart's EVP Loic Le Meur for the tip) and yet... Kensington is saying nothing. At least not on their site (as of this writing).

Kensington makes stuff for computers so there's an obvious online

Ktgtoplogo_1First it was Kryptonite's U-shaped bike locks (you can pick them with a bic pen). Now it's Kensington's laptop locking gizmo (you just need scissors, duct tape and a toilet paper). The buzz is all over the blogosphere (thanks to Six Apart's EVP Loic Le Meur for the tip) and yet... Kensington is saying nothing. At least not on their site (as of this writing).

Kensington makes stuff for computers so there's an obvious online connection with customers. Even if the company doesn't have a blog, there should be something on their home page acknowledging the problem, right?!

Guys, guys. It's so easy to monitor the blogosphere and find out what's being said about your company. Go to www.Blogpulse.com right now.…

nickusborne_book2medium.gif Run don't walk to Nick Usborne's Excess Voice site to grab your free copy of his new e-book, Writing for the Web: 7 Challenges Every Writer and Copywriter Faces. It's 35 pages and nicely illustrated with screenshots. And of course written in Nick's inimitable style. I like Challenge #2 -- How to write for a site's three audiences: the company behind the site, visitors to the site... and search engines. A great read and a nickusborne_book2medium.gif Run don't walk to Nick Usborne's Excess Voice site to grab your free copy of his new e-book, Writing for the Web: 7 Challenges Every Writer and Copywriter Faces. It's 35 pages and nicely illustrated with screenshots. And of course written in Nick's inimitable style. I like Challenge #2 -- How to write for a site's three audiences: the company behind the site, visitors to the site... and search engines. A great read and a keeper.

Spelled out here in an article by Neville Hobson in today’s Web Pro News. Which points to IBMer James Snell’s blog where he has posted the IBM guidelines. He notes that IBM today posted on its intranet an exhortation to its 320,000+ employees to consider blogging. Courtesy of James, you can download the guidelines as a 6-page PDF. Download IBM’s Blogging Policy & Guidelines as a PDF. Notable highlights:

  • "IBMers are personally

Rss_feedicon48x48_2 For those who have yet to hop on to the RSS (Really Simple Syndication) bandwagon, the effort can seem more like a confusing leap than a few easy mouse clicks.

Easy-to-grasp definition of RSS

Here is an easy-to-grasp definition of RSS, courtesy of Anil Dash, a VP of SixApart which makes MovableType and TypePad (popular blogging software). He calls RSS:

"The technology built into blogs to notify you of updates. You can get

Hugh_whycorpblogworksHugh nails it... and with a cool cartoon to boot. (© Hugh Macleod). He divides your marketing into two parts, using an inner and outer circle.

1. The "internal conversation" your company is having with itself (circle A).

2. The "external conversation" your company should be having with, er, customers (circle B).

The membrane between these two areas should be porous enough that they are "aligned." I.e. you're listening to your

Hugh_whycorpblogworksHugh nails it... and with a cool cartoon to boot. (© Hugh Macleod). He divides your marketing into two parts, using an inner and outer circle.

1. The "internal conversation" your company is having with itself (circle A).

2. The "external conversation" your company should be having with, er, customers (circle B).

The membrane between these two areas should be porous enough that they are "aligned." I.e. you're listening to your customers and talking back to them about stuff they care about. In other words, you (your company) and your customers are talking about the same thing.

And... corporate blogs can enable this conversation. Tony Dowler makes a good point, however. Blogs are not the only conversations you should be having with customers. You…

Front-page article in today's USA Today (I'm quoted!) says CEOs refuse to get tangled up in messy blogs. Steve Rubel makes two points about the story: 1. It can be more effective to have a lower-level employee blog "from the gut" of a company and 2. Only a few CEO bloggers are "naturals." For example, Mark Cuban, Bob Liodice, Alan Meckler and Bob Lutz. I left Steve the following comment:

Great point that some CEOs are "naturals" who

Front-page article in today's USA Today (I'm quoted!) says CEOs refuse to get tangled up in messy blogs. Steve Rubel makes two points about the story: 1. It can be more effective to have a lower-level employee blog "from the gut" of a company and 2. Only a few CEO bloggers are "naturals." For example, Mark Cuban, Bob Liodice, Alan Meckler and Bob Lutz. I left Steve the following comment:

Great point that some CEOs are "naturals" who can "blog from the gut." Makes me wonder if they're also exceptionally good communicators offline. I.e. genuine, straight, no bullshit. And if "good blogging" can be taught to senior execs for whom it doesn't come naturally. Waddya think?? - DW

Addendum: didn't notice at first that I was quoted in the USAToday article. I spoke with reporter Del Jones weeks ago but had forgotten about it.…

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I’ve been writing about corporate and CEO blogging and business use of social media for over a decade. I welcome your Comments if they are on topic. I delete them if inappropriate or spammy.

 

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